Ken Harris

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Member Since: 1/31/2003
Total Mixes: 26
Total Feedback: 200
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Other Mixes By Ken Harris

CD | Mixed Genre
CD | Mixed Genre
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CD | Theme - Alternating DJ
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CD | Theme
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The Heart Of Cinema

Artist Song Buy
Richard Strauss  Also Sprach Zarathustra  buy on itunes
Pachobel  Pachobel's Canon  buy on itunes
Dick Dale & The Del-Tones  Miserlou  buy on itunes
Harry McClintock  Big Rock Candy Mountain  buy on itunes
Frank Sinatra  Young At Heart  buy on itunes
Arvo Part  Spiegel Im Spiegel  buy on itunes
Eric Weissburg  Dueling Banjos  buy on itunes
The Patriotic Fathers  By The Beautiful Sea  buy on itunes
Beau Hunks  Bells  buy on itunes
Jack Nitzsche  Charmaine  buy on itunes
Glenn Miller  Moonlight Serenade  buy on itunes
Jacques Offenbach  Barcarolle  buy on itunes
The Chambers Brothers  Time Has Come Today  buy on itunes
Willie Nelson  Blue Skies  buy on itunes
The Grateful Dead  Ripple  buy on itunes
The Everly Brothers  Bye Bye Love  buy on itunes
Marvin Hamlisch  End Credits  buy on itunes
Handel  Sarabande  buy on itunes

Comment:

I've been thinking, now that it's Oscar time and all, about some songs that, IMHO, have been used very effectively in film, to the point where when I hear the music, I think the film. Admittedly very, very subjective. 1) Too obvious. 2) The opening scene of "Ordinary People". 3) Talk about an incendiary opening! From "Pulp Fiction", of course. 4) Heartbreaking and pithy in "O Brother, Where Art Thou?". 5) The images of red scare photos, including the Rosenbergs and their children at the opening of "The Front" juxtapose in ways that permanently haunt this recording. 6) Heartbreakingly tender and intimate in a perfectly filmed scene in "Wit", between a dying Emma Thompson and her mentor, played by Eileen Atkins. 7) Too obvious. 8) More great juxtaposition in the very underrated "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?", as exhausted and desperate dance marathoners push themselves. 9) Lovely, fun-spirited trademark Hal Roach/Laurel & Hardy stock music. 10) Evocative track from "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest". 11) Used brilliantly in "Carnal Knowledge". 12) This was the opera scene in "Life Is Beautiful", where Guido courts his true love, Dora, from the orchestra to the balcony. 13) The soundtrack to Bruce Dern's unraveling in "Coming Home". 14) In "Patch Adams" (an admittedly dismissible film), Robin Williams sings this to a dying child. 15) Playing on the kitchen radio at the end of "Mask" as Cher wonders why Rocky isn't awake yet. 16) Over the top, neurotic heart attack fantasy sequence in "All That Jazz". 17) The only real "score" music in the group, but gorgeous as the ghostly image of Sophie and Nathan fills the screen. 18) The stunning and perfectly chosen musical piece that runs throughout and ends "Barry Lyndon".

What great ones did I miss??

I'd love to share this...Let me know if you'd like a link...
image for mix

Feedback:

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lanhamyodel
Date: 2/25/2008
The first movie soundtrack that deeply impressed me was the one for "Once Upon a Time in the West", scored by Ennio Morricone. Both the main theme and the theme for harmonica left a deep impression on my young and impressionable mind at the time. The theme for is also very powerful and always brings back movie images for me.
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musicgnome
Date: 2/25/2008
I, for one, would love to hear this. Very emotive stuff. And, wonderul notes. Encore!
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divinyl
Date: 2/25/2008
Of more modern films, I thought the score for "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" was quite well done. Nice concept.
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Pop Kulcher
Date: 2/26/2008
Very cool, and very different from what I'd have thought of. I don't remember "Ripple" being played during Mask, but maybe because whenever I see it on tv I'm too busy kicking myself for getting all weepy at a Cher movie. And kudos on the shout-out to All That Jazz, one of my favorite movies (all pretentiousness and supercharged Fosse ego notwithstanding) with myriad excellent uses of music. (Nilsson's "Perfect Day" is even more effectively used, in my opinion.)
Forced to pick other movies where I can no longer hear the music without visualizing the film, I'd have to give a big not to Martin Scorcese, particularly Goodfellas (i.e. the closing piano section of "Layla" as the bodies turn up all over town; the Stones' "Monkee Man" and Nilsson's "Jump Into The Fire" -- hey, again with the Nilsson! -- perfectly capturing the coke-fueled paranoid frenzy before Liotta's arrest). Though "Last Train To Clarksville" took on a whole new life after After Hours as well.
Others? Echo & The Bunnymen's "Killing Moon" during the opening of Donnie Darko was amazingly evocative; plus just about anything on the soundtrack of Valley Girl (the Plimouls' "Million Miles Away," Modern English's "Melt With You") is integrally tied to the soundtrack, and I could probably say the same about various 80's tunes used in John Hughes films. I'll leave it there...
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Pop Kulcher
Date: 2/26/2008
Er... that's a big NOD to Scorcese, not a big NOT.
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Darth Pazuzu
Date: 2/26/2008
Wow! This is a really cool cinema mix. An great opener with R. Strauss' Zarathustra, and the perfect closer with Handel's Sarabande. (And I personally think that Barry Lyndon is one of Kubrick's most underrated films!)

And in between, you've got Pachelbel's Canon, Dick Dale's Miserlou, Duelling Banjos, Time Has Come Today, and Bye Bye Love! Seriously, what's not to love?!
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sammyg123
Date: 2/26/2008
A great theme and a fantastic mix. Really great. I could just copy and paste Pop Kulchers comment as I agree with pretty much all of it. But a link you say? Yes. Yes please...
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Media Vixen: Radio Sally
Date: 2/26/2008
Always nice to see you mixing, bud. Thoughtful and thought-provoking. Love to hear it meself.
Nice notes, too!
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blasikin
Date: 2/26/2008
Wonderful notes, and responses. Aotm is still one of the best reads on the internet thanks to this kind of effort. I first heard that Chambers Brothers song in Spike Lee's Crooklyn (I think the kids sniff glue to it). A great mix and rental list! Thanks.
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Mixxer
Date: 2/26/2008
Wow, great idea Ken. Nice picks and research.
I don't go to movies too often but let throw in the Delfonics, "Didn't I Blow Your Mind This Time" used in Jackie Brown circa 1997.
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RetroJoe
Date: 2/26/2008
And track 11 was also used in the movie "The Glenn Miller Story" which hit the screens in February 1954. It was of course his theme song which he composed (originally released in 1939 and reached #3 on the charts).Many great tunes and a wonderful idea and mix!
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jemelend
Date: 2/26/2008
this was a really cool idea. great songs and notes.
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sbessg
Date: 2/27/2008
The Glenn Miller Story!Oh, wait, someone else already said that. Gah, I love that movie. Definitely check it out.<3 Sara
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buglady
Date: 2/28/2008
Wow, an inspired idea and a very eclectic mix.
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Bear
Date: 2/29/2008
Great mix and great notes- nice work!
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doowad
Date: 3/26/2008
Not big on the Dead or Hamlisch, but I love the rest.

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