Pop Kulcher

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Member Since: 7/1/2002
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The Soundtrack Soundtrack

Artist Song Buy
Dick Dale  Misirlou
[Pulp Fiction, 1994]  
buy on itunes
Echo & The Bunnymen  The Killing Moon
[Donnie Darko, 2001] 
buy on itunes
Rolling Stones  Monkey Man
[Goodfellas, 1990] 
buy on itunes
Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich  Hold Tight
[Grindhouse - Death Proof, 2007] 
buy on itunes
Simon & Garfunkel  April Come She Will
[The Graduate, 1967] 
buy on itunes
Joe Walsh/The Eagles  In The City
[The Warriors, 1979] 
buy on itunes
The Band  The Weight
[The Big Chill, 1983] 
buy on itunes
Psychedelic Furs  Pretty In Pink
[Pretty In Pink, 1986] 
buy on itunes
Replacements  Within Your Reach
[Say Anything, 1989] 
buy on itunes
The Creation  Making Time
[Rushmore, 1998] 
buy on itunes
Cat Stevens  On The Road To Find Out
[Harold and Maude, 1971] 
buy on itunes
The Cure  Six Different Ways
[Rules of Attraction, 2002] 
buy on itunes
Stealers Wheel  Stuck In The Middle With You
[Reservoir Dogs, 1992] 
buy on itunes
Donovan  Colours
[Rules of Attraction, 2002] 
buy on itunes
Harry Nilsson  Perfect Day
[All That Jazz, 1979] 
buy on itunes
Sex Pistols  Pretty Vacant
[American Pop, 1981] 
buy on itunes
The Shins  New Slang
[Garden State, 2004] 
buy on itunes
Dusty Springfield  Son Of A Preacher Man
[Pulp Fiction, 1994] 
buy on itunes
The Plimsouls  A Million Miles Away
[Valley Girl, 1983] 
buy on itunes
The Doors  The End {edit}
[Apocalypse Now, 1979] 
buy on itunes
Peggy Lee  Is That All There Is?
[After Hours, 1985] 
buy on itunes

Comment:

This is, as the title suggests, a collection of songs used in various films. Not soundtrack music, or songs written/performed specifically for use in the movie, but rather pre-existing songs used by the director to great effect in a movie. Now, any Hollywood peon can cobble together some songs, with an eye towards cross-marketing a soundtrack album. But it takes a real artist to utilize the music in such a way that nobody who sees the movie will ever hear the song again without remembering the movie or, even better, the particular scene in which it was used.
This is a collection of those songs. Every one of these tracks was, in my opinion, used so distinctively that I can't hear the song these days without immediately viewing the scene again in my head. Some directors -- Quentin Tarantino and Martin Scorcese in particular, but Wes Anderson and others as well over the past few decades, have shown a real knack for taking some random song from the past and making it seem like it was written and performed wholly for the scene in which it was played.
This turned into much more of an ordeal to make than I'd assumed. Had to make some tough cuts; I certainly couldn't do without "The End," a song I will forever associate with Coppola's timeless Apocalypse Now, but at nearly 12 minutes it was forcing me to cut a handful of tracks, so I ended up fading it early and losing the last 4 minutes. Still ended up cutting Petty's "American Girl" (from Fast Times at Ridgemont High) and Colin Newman's "Alone" (from Silence of the Lambs. Otherwise, mangaged to fit most of what I'd hoped to include, though I had to cherry pick a few tracks off Pulp Fiction and ended up not using anything from Dazed & Confused.
Incidentally, should you wish to download this -- there is an error in the back cover art included with the download; let me know if you'd like it and I can email you the corrected version.
image for mix

Feedback:

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darrylseattle
Date: 4/6/2008
i for one wholeheartedly agree - thank you
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doowad
Date: 4/6/2008
The Tarantino and Hal Ashby songs most ring true for me. I think you are missing a movie on the Weight.
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anthony lombardi
Date: 4/6/2008
what a terrific idea. one i'm quite jealous i didn't think of first. i concur that it takes a truly visionary filmmaker to utilize a song in such a singular way, you'll never think of the song without the scene again. the three directors you namechecked - scorsese, tarantino, & anderson - are all examples i use when explaining this type of thing. tons of songs here would make my list - the pulp fiction picks (my number one all-time favorite song, by the way), the shins, 'mats, stones. just a fantastic idea, marc, really, & great execution from all angles.
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njr
Date: 4/6/2008
More, please, on this cinematastical theme!
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KathrynandRupert
Date: 4/7/2008
Deserves plaudits for including that song from Harold and Maude, one of the best films of all time. Great to see Is That All There Is? from another good, almost forgotten, film.
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Rob Conroy
Date: 4/7/2008
This is really, really great, my friend; it's filled with some of my absolute favorite movie soundtrack moments, as well. I second KathrynandRupert's nod to After Hours, one of my favorite unsung films of all-time. I'm also with doowad re: "The Weight"... IMHO, it's utilized infinitely more effectively in Easy Rider (but then again, I *hate* The Big Chill).
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avocado rabbit
Date: 4/7/2008
Most of us around here are making soundtracks for something every time we mix. This is the epitome of what we do.
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Mark Petruccelli
Date: 4/7/2008
A truly great compilation. The Shins, Doors and Dick Dale are shining examples here (as is the entire Harold & Maude soundrack.)
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Sean Lally
Date: 4/7/2008
Super duper great!
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doowad
Date: 4/7/2008
When I commented, "The Big Chill" was not listed, but I have to say Rob and I do agree. It was used much more effectively in Easy Rider, as was Wasn't Born to Follow, which will always remind me of Captain America & Wyatt riding through the woods. I think the Big Chill probably had the worst effect a soundtrack can have because so many people associate that music with that film, rather than as the stand-alone art away from the navel-gazing issues from Kasdan and friends.
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buglady
Date: 4/7/2008
I've got to agree with the others on this one, some of my favorite tracks from some of my favorite movies. Harold and Maude turned me into a Cat Stevens fan when I was 2O. After hours is a brilliant flick that I always recommend to friends. Great job Marc!
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Ken Harris
Date: 4/7/2008
Outstanding articulation on something I recently attempted. And I agree 100% with all your choices. Listening to "The End" with the ghastly images of napalm being dropped is as somber as it gets...Bravo!
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Mixxer
Date: 4/7/2008
Not sure I see enough movies to fully appreciate this, but it looks really good. Speaking of Reservoir Dogs, I always think of "Little Green Bag" first.
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Pop Kulcher
Date: 4/7/2008
On The Big Chill point: Yes, that movie does perfectly illustrate convincingly (or, as in the case of that film, with the subtlety of a flying mallet) that the use of music in a movie can also run the risk of "ruining" the songs. I have mixed feelings about the movie, but I can't say I'm delighted that I'm unable to hear many of the songs on that soundtrack without conjuring up images of Kevin Kline and friends in the kitchen, jogging in the woods, etc. But you do have to give Kasdan some credit for that.
The same pro/con argument applies equally to the use of popular music in commercials. On the one hand, think how many people discovered Nick Drake because of a car commercial... on the other hand, for those who already loved "Pink Moon," could you ever enjoy it the same way after that?
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sport !
Date: 4/7/2008
Great, great mix!
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sammyg123
Date: 4/7/2008
Well, who can argue with the opening two tracks here? I'd have gone for 'Layla' myself on Goodfellas. And while I'm on a 'this is what I'd have done' trip, (sorry) I'd have found room for Roy Orbison's 'In Dreams' from Blue Velvet.
However, great mix - that Tarantino fella knows a good tune and where to place it doesn't he? And 'New Slang' damn near DID change my life...
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Funky Ratchet
Date: 4/8/2008
The director's cut of Donnie Darko tragically replaces "Killing Moon" with the originally-intended "Never Tear Us Apart" (INXS). Not completely ineffective, I guess, but certainly not as evocative. One of the many problems I have with the director's cut, in fact. Love the mix.
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gabechouinard
Date: 4/8/2008
Fantastic mix. It's interesting to hear what others have to say about it, too; it illustrates how differently we perceive things, I think. For instance, when I think of Donnie Darko, it's "Mad World" all the way, baby....
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gabechouinard
Date: 4/8/2008
Which, of course, doesn't fit your criteria. But still... :)
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anthony lombardi
Date: 4/8/2008
i have to agree with sammy re:goodfellas - i think the use of "layla" is probably one of the top 5 uses of music in film ever, if not the greatest...
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Pop Kulcher
Date: 4/8/2008
I agree that "Layla" was used to amazing effect in Goodfellas, and Anthony may be exactly right... but I opted against using it largely because only the closing piano segment was used, and thus I didn't want to use the entire song [and I've already used the stand-alone closing section on my mental illness mix].
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Moe
Date: 4/8/2008
A big thumbs up from me! Love the inclusion of Cat Stevens/Harold and Maude, The Creation/Rushmore and the Shins/Garden State. And of course it must have been tough choosing between the Plimsouls and Pat Travers as the memorable song from Valley Girl ;) Save me an aisle seat.
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Bear
Date: 4/10/2008
I agree with Sammy and that Ratchet fella- a David Lynch pick would a been cool, and 'The Killing Moon' (and the movie it comes from) is deathless. Great mix anyway; you could so do a volume 2.
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doowad
Date: 4/12/2008
No, I disagree with Anthony and Sammy on the song from Goodfellas. I would go with Jump Into The Fire, which so captures that Cocaine/helicopter madness at the end of the flick. And Amores Perros did for Long Cool Woman what Reservoir Dogs did for Stuck in Middle with You. An ironic dTnouement could have been Like A Virgin from Dogs as well.

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